Communities of practice

Communities of practice (CoP) are relevant actors like soil experts, behavioral scientists, specialists in pedagogy, in education, and in communication, policy makers as well as soil dependent business representatives, interested communities and citizen’s organizations.

In short, multi-actor panels that will be put in place to support the identification and mapping of training resources and needs and to help co-create new modules to bridge identified gaps in the field of soil literacy. Each CoP will be led by a consortium partner.

‘The work of external actors in the CoPs will be voluntary and on the basis of expressed commitment. Workload is intended to be low.

Each Partner setting up a CoP needs to decide on how to best organize their CoPs, and at the same time, Each CoP leader will also set up an Education Innovation Group (EIG).
Each national EIG will include CoP leaders and around 3-5 selected experts from each participating country.

Which are the benefits of being a member of the CoP?

  • Be part of a national network of soil health advocates.
  • Enhance your own professional network by collaborating with LOESS consortium members and CoP members from your country and across Europe.
  • Contribute to the implementation of the EU Soil Mission and influence future generations’ understanding of soil.
  • Gain early access to new educational materials and training courses for use in your work.
  • Receive invitations to project workshops and events, both online and in person formats, national and European.
  • Receive first-hand information about the project results and findings.
  • Contribute to promoting soil health as an important policy issue among policy makers.
  • Acknowledgement of your contribution in appropriate project communication activities.

Who could be part of each CoP?

Around 15 participants with a varied composition of:

  • Researchers at universities, research institutes (biology, geography, chemistry, physics, environmental studies, water engineering, climate change, biodiversity, sustainable development, agriculture, land management, forestry, social scientists, pedagogy….)
  • Lecturers and students at universities / HEIs / vocational colleges (environmental studies, agriculture, land management, forestry, geodesy ….)
  • Teachers at high schools / upper secondary schools (science subjects, geography, agriculture) and teacher trainers
  • Primary school teachers, outdoor education, forest schools, nature initiatives
  • Non-formal educators, school garden projects, agricultural museums, organizations/centers/networks/farms that offer on site visits, courses on sustainable development
  • Civil society organizations and citizen groups (environmental issues, community groups, allotments)
  • Public administration representatives (Ministries of Education / Agriculture / Environment, City planners, local authorities and regional authorities concerned with sustainability, communal green space management
  • Practitioners of various sectors and professions whose existing activities might be extended to include actions on soil literacy and soil health improvement (e.g. environmental conservation groups, urban food initiatives associations, city greening initiatives, school gardens, farming, food production)
  • Members of other EU-projects or national/regional projects addressing soil health/education
  • Members of relevant umbrella pan European organizations, networks and associations

What will they do?

  • Provide ideas and feedback to support the development of new educational materials.
  • Support effective networking through a regular involvement of regional partners.
  • Support international competence exchange.
  • Enhance knowledge sharing among authorities on best practice processes and outcomes.
  • Create spaces for a dialogue on soil health challenges, including creating a shared understanding of both biophysical and socio-economic-political dimensions of soil health related challenges.
  • Generate a shared ownership of achievements and results and contribute to outcomes lasting beyond LOESS’ life span
The Incredible Edible Network is a network of people in different cities throughout the UK, and beyond, that connects people within communities by engaging them in the transformation of the own urban (from small villages to large towns) landscape where they live, and by turning disused urban plots into a source of healthy food.
 
Land uses: Agriculture, Natural, Urban
The Incredible Edible Network is a network of people in different cities throughout the UK, and beyond, that connects people within communities by engaging them in the transformation of the own urban (from small villages to large towns) landscape where they live, and by turning disused urban plots into a source of healthy food.
 
Land uses: Agriculture, Natural, Urban
The Incredible Edible Network is a network of people in different cities throughout the UK, and beyond, that connects people within communities by engaging them in the transformation of the own urban (from small villages to large towns) landscape where they live, and by turning disused urban plots into a source of healthy food.
 
Land uses: Agriculture, Natural, Urban
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